Ink Now

Expo Dome, Expo Park, Taipei
January 18-21, 2019

Artists

Chia Hu
Julie Hsieh

Press

Dawn
Dawn
Chia Hu
2015
ink on paper (75 x 50 cm)
Ying-Yang
Ying-Yang
Chia Hu
2015
ink on paper (155 x 128.7 cm)
Quiet mountain
Quiet mountain
Chia Hu
2018
ink on paper (91 x 219.6 cm)
Moss
Moss
Chia Hu
2014
ink on paper
Three things
Three things
Chia Hu
2018
ink on paper (70 x 105 cm)
Concerto
Concerto
Julie Hsieh
2018
ink on paper (110 x 230 cm)
Wind Shadow
Wind Shadow
Julie Hsieh
2018
ink on paper (105 x 176 cm)
Trajectory
Trajectory
Julie Hsieh
2018
ink on paper (110 x 145 cm)
Waltz
Waltz
Julie Hsieh
2018
ink on paper (110 x 150 cm)
Flying dragon dancing phoenix
Flying dragon dancing phoenix
Julie Hsieh
2018
ink on paper (110 x 218 cm)
Gossamer
Gossamer
Julie Hsieh
2018
ink on paper (132 x 100 cm)
In the ink paintings of Julie Hsieh, we see a female artist who revels in her study of music and art. She enters the world of ink in a direct and charming way by injecting a simple musicality that provides her work with a sense of rhythm. She uses a soft, hand-made brush like a mop—which has a similar look as the strands of her hair—to drag the ink on large rice paper. The vortex action of her sliding brush on the surface of paper is free and has the feel of creation. Explosive, like a whirlwind and a dazzling movement, it appears as a momentary projection of the huge cyclone in the universe. This is as much a dance as a painting. Sometimes she draws directly with her fingers to produce subtle marks to better realize her vision. There are two types of traces that contrast to form the defining linguistic features of Julie Hsieh’s paintings. First, she forms fine gossamers lines by the swift movement of her brush across the paper. What Julie Hsieh consciously pursues are thin lines that can breathe. It is like the natural reverberation of the ancient Chinese technique of “yóu sīxiàn”: the carving of curves as thin as gossamers on jade. It is conveyed, however, by action rather than calligraphy. These thin lines seem to breath and yell as they run in on their own swirls and reverberation. They echo like the soul’s desire to share its mood and meaning with the universe. Second, there is the gravity of the thick ink, which focuses on its explosive power and force. This type of stroke seems to make the picture sound, as if you can hear explosions. The explosive point of gravity and the swirling feelings of the filament in her artworks are like the contrast between pureness and musical tension, lightness and gravity, fragment and heaviness, concentration and scatter; her art seems to echo with this endless power and sound waves. This is the swirling of the rhythm and the perfect connection between both senses of vision and hearing. The ink paintings of Julie Hsieh are the paintings of life’s dance with rich black-and-white blooms as well as the vivid and majestic contemporary expression of black-and-white art. This painting style emphasizes the painter’s movement in the process of creating. It expresses the artist’s emotions, energy, and spirit. It is through this that her paintings acquire a graceful and majestic life.